Let’s talk CONFIDENCE

The thing I like about the word ‘confidence’, is that to almost every single person on the planet it could mean something slightly different. From body confidence, to personality confidence, to occupational confidence; all have different attributes and all have different results. As fitness is obviously a huge part of my life, confidence surrounding body image is the area in which I feel as though I deal in the most. It’s an incredibly tricky subject to discuss on social media, as due to affecting such a large majority of the online population it therefore tends to attract some rather controversial opinions. One of which I believe to be that those who choose to share their fitness progress are often met with phrases such as ‘showing off’ and ‘boasting’.

The idea of shaming those who post these types of pictures both saddens and confuses me. Firstly, any girl, boy, women or man who feels pleased with the progress they have made to both their body and their health surely should not be made to feel discouraged? They should be made to feel congratulated and subsequently full of high hopes to continue their journey. Secondly, social media is FULL of people sharing news about their school grades, university acceptance, new job offer, marriage, kids, a new house; personal things in which they are proud of. So, if this is deemed socially acceptable, with posts like these receiving handfuls of likes & supportive comments from friends and family then why is it not the same for fitness posts?

The reasoning I have for this particular difference is that body confidence is something which EVERYONE struggles with, no matter how confident you may seem on the outside. From children starting high school, to fitness models at the top of the industry, everyone has parts of themselves which they dislike and wish they could change. Therefore, when viewing a friends, colleagues or even a random accounts fitness progress it can be hard to be pleased for them without succumbing to the thoughts inside your head of ‘I wish I was that skinny’ or ‘I wish my legs looked like that’.

However, the picture you are viewing on social media is a post most likely chosen out of 20-30 others, impeccably posed and then edited to the best of the account owner’s ability. So, although some people accuse transformation pictures and gym selfies as being over-confident, the reality is that these pictures have undergone just as much self-scrutiny as a typical Facebook profile picture receives. Although the person is incredibly happy with their current progress in the gym, they still have insecurities surrounding their body and goals they want to achieve.

In my opinion, for every post in which it is clear that the person behind it is proud of something, we should respond with praise and encouragement. Your reception may be the difference in them deciding to continue to pursue the difference they want to make, or giving up.

Screw the Scales

If you follow me on Instagram (paigefitnessuk), then you’ll know that I’ve talked quite a lot recently about my experiences on a lean//slow bulk. Due to a stomach infection last September, followed by training for a half-marathon, I lost a LOT of weight. I didn’t find this out by weighing myself, I found this out by my worried mum noticing how much muscle I’d lost on my legs, followed by a friend at uni, who I hadn’t seen for a while, commenting on the thinness of my arms after a reunion hug. For some people, I understand that these comments might have appeared upsetting, but for me it was exactly what I needed to hear. Because you are looking at yourself everyday, it’s almost impossible for you to see the extent of personal weight loss/weight gain, so sometimes it takes a family member, friend or even a doctor to inform you otherwise.

I have NEVER been the type of girl to weight herself week in/week out, but out of pure interest following both these comments I weighed myself and I was completely shocked. I weighed 51KG, which at the height of 5″7 is scientifically classed on the BMI scale as underweight. I had been following a Paleo based diet, due to ongoing stomach issues, which is perfectly fine, but seeing as I was still weight-training 4/5 times per week I now realise that I was getting absolutely no where near the calories my body needed to a) correctly function and b) repair and look after my muscles. Looking back on some of my ‘What I Eat In A Day’ posts or videos, I’m convinced that on some days I wasn’t even hitting 1200 calories, which is extremely dangerous for someone of my measurements.

So, after a few days of moral panic, where I started to doubt everything to do with my fitness regime/diet/life (shout out to my mum for rearing me back to sanity), I am FINALLY back and feeling content for the first time in just under a year. I’m aiming for around 2300 calories a day, with the minimum always being 2000, and I’m making sure I’m getting heaps of protein and healthy fats. If you were to compare by current regime to a standardised diet, the #iifym is probably the most accurate. However, I’m not obsessing over every gram or losing sleep if I don’t hit my recommended macros, I’m simply loosely tracking to ensure I’m getting the correct nutrients and calories in which my body needs.

I recently did a comparison picture on Instagram which inspired me to write this post. This particular picture gained the most activity out of all my posts, with the important message being that just because your weight has gone up on the scales, does not mean this a negative thing. Within two weeks of eating properly and consequently smashing my workouts, I’ve had several compliments from family and friends on my current physique, but the most obvious thing which has changed about me is my mood. I can’t describe how much happier I am in myself and my body. I’m starting to enjoy food again and even though some days I feel down if my stomachs playing up, I know that the place I’m at now is exactly where I need to be.

Life Made Easier with Meal Prep

Summer in the UK is a big deal. Well, let me re-phrase, summer which actually represents a summer (aka the sun actually comes out) is a big deal. It puts the majority of the UK population in a better mood, makes for a better Instagram picture and also simultaneously turns said population into alcoholics, with “pub?” or “drinks tonight?” being frequent questions amongst thousands of group chats.

And although alcohol is your fitness stories worst enemy, it would be rude not to enjoy the rare occurrence of being sat outside in the sun with a #bev repeating “wow, it’s boiling isn’t it?”, applying the temperature filter on snapchat or tweeting “this weather” followed by a tick emoji. So, in order to stay on track with that summer body, a simple trick is to meal prep throughout the week so that you can indulge in these types of treats and not feel guilty.

Whether you’re at work or at home, meal prepping saves time, money and prevents you going off track by grabbing the nearest thing in sight when the hunger pains hit. I’m more of a grazer, so I tend to go for a three meals and then 4 snacks throughout the day. However, I am currently choosing to do a ‘slow bulk’, in order to bring back some of the muscle I lost from half-marathon training, so if you’re looking to lean out then three meals and two to three snacks will be sufficient.

I like to keep my meal prep interesting. You should look forward to the food you’ve got to eat- not dread it. Below I’m going to include an example of a lean meal prep and a ‘slow bulk’ meal prep, which can also be followed by those who are planning on lifting heavy weights on that specific day.

LEAN PREP

Breakfast: Spinach, Blueberries, 1 ripe Banana & Almond Milk Smoothie

Snack: Nature Valley Oat Bar / Primal Pantry Bar / Deliciously Ella Ball

Lunch: Protein | Healthy Fats | Greens

Combo 1: Chicken, Avocado, Spinach

Combo 2: Boiled Eggs, Walnuts, Kale

Combo 3: Tuna, Avocado, Lettuce

Combo 4: Salmon, Walnuts, Asparagus

Snack: Sliced Banana on Nairns Crackers with a drizzle of Honey

Dinner: Protein | Carbs | Vegetables

Combo 1: Chicken, Coconut Rice, Asparagus

Combo 2: Sea Bass, New Potatoes, fried Courgette & Tomatoes

Combo 3: Low-Fat Mince, Wholegrain Pasta, Tomato Puree & fried Peppers

Combo 4: Lightly Battered Haddock, Coconut Rice, Tomatoes, Cucumber, Lettuce

Snack (if needed): Two scoops of Swedish Glace Ice Cream

Water Intake: 3-4 Litres & 2 Peppermint Teas

 

‘SLOW BULK’ or HEAVY WEIGHTS PREP

Breakfast: Wholegrain Rolled Oats, Coyo Yoghurt, Blueberries

Snack 1: Pineapple Chunks, Strawberries & Raspberries

Snack 2: Rebel Kitchen Mylk Drink / Kombuccha / Coconut Water

Lunch: Protein | Carbs | Healthy Fats | Greens

Combo 1: Chicken, Sourdough Bread, Avocado Lettuce, Tomato

Combo 2: Tuna, Coconut Rice, Walnuts, Spinach

Combo 3: Salmon, Wholegrain Bagel, Low-Fat Cream Cheese & Asparagus

Combo 4: Sea Bass, Wholegrain Pasta, Chia Seeds, Lettuce, Tomatoes

Snack 3: Gluten Free Ginger Snaps / Nature Valley Oat Bar / Proper Corn Popcorn

Dinner: Protein | Carbs | Healthy Fats | Greens

Combo 1: Chicken, Whole Grain Pasta, Coconut Oil, Spinach

Combo 2: Poached Eggs, Whole grain Bagel, Avocado, Asparagus

Combo 3: Heck Sausages, New Potatoes, Chia Seeds, Green Beans

Combo 4: Low-Fat Minced Burger, Sweet Potato, Walnuts, Peppers

Snack 4: Paleo Blueberry Muffin, Blueberries, Strawberries, Swedish Glace Ice Cream

Water Intake: 2/3 Litres & 1 Peppermint Tea

Meal Prep is a great way to keep on track but it’s important not to get too caught up with it. Make sure you have 2 or 3 treats a week, enjoy these treats without feeling guilty and if you slip from prep don’t feel bad! Just enjoy the rest and be extra motivated to get back to it the next day 🙂

Click here to see my latest video of a KILLER glute workout and my moving to london blog.

Collaboration With The Pilates Studio

Pilates is often stereotyped as a form of exercise which is substantially less vigorous than the majority of other workout options. In terms of how you feel during the session; fairly relaxed and not too out of breath, it definitely feels less strenuous than say a high intensity session. However, because you are repeatedly engaging your muscles and paying attention to specific areas of your body, Pilates can often be a more beneficial workout.

There are a few variations of the workout including mat, barre and reformer machines. The most popular is a mat pilates session, upon where you work through a process of strengthening and toning exercises in order target different muscle groups. Even though the tempo is fairly moderate, the results you can get from continuous sessions of this format is incredible. Within a few weeks you feel stronger, more toned and eager to try more difficult moves.

Having only ever experienced this form of pilates, I was incredibly excited to have the opportunity to try more variations of this ancient exercise at The Pilates Studio in Norwich. Nestled down a scenic side street, The Pilates Studio boasts a wide range of machines in the most aesthetically pleasing and relaxing studio. The owner of the studio and experienced teacher, Lauren, tentatively went through each exercise by informing me and my friend, Lorna, the science behind the effects it was having on our bodies and how it would help our posture and flexibility. After only an hour’s session, both me and Lorna agreed that we had learnt more from our time with Lauren than we had with any other fitness instructor.

A real eye-opening moment for me during the session was Lauren’s comments on how both me and Lorna naturally do not sit with correct posture. We both appeared to hold our spine at an angle, most likely due to our prominent lifestyle of spending hours on end sitting at a desk studying. Alongside this reason, which will affect a large majority of the student population, another factor to our improper posture are exercises which me and my friend regularly partake in. As fans of Les Milles Body Pump class, there are frequent elements of fast paced deadlifting, which appears to helped in forcing mine and Lorna’s spine to naturally fall into an incorrect position. Lauren aided us in helping to focus on correcting this error and by the end of the session my back felt sufficiently stretched and less tense. When I go to deadlift now I make a conscious effort to make sure my back is set in the correct position, and I have subsequently noticed a big difference in terms of my upper body flexibility and ability to perform more reps.

A lot of people associate pilates as being an exercise for the older generation. However, with young people spending more time than ever at a desk, or slouched over their phone, it is just as important for our generation to practise pilates in order to assess and prevent issues within our bodies which may occur later in life. At her studio, Lauren offers both group and private sessions. For your first time I would highly recommend a private session, so Lauren can figure out your strengths and weaknesses in order to tailor your sessions in a way which will benefit you the most.

I cannot thank Lauren enough for the patient and methodical approach she took for our session. I learnt so much about my body and, due to implementing the tips given to us, I feel as though my posture has greatly improved after only a week on. To book a session at The Pilates Studio, simply contact Lauren by email on info@thepilatesstudionorwich.com or ring 07891 987055. It’s also worthwhile checking out her Instagram, @thepilatesstudio_norwich, which is full of mindful quotes and amazing progress pictures. If you want to see the session in action, then click here to watch the video we filmed on the day.

 

Zucchini Noodle Bolognese

Due to loving absolutely everything about Italy; the culture, the scenery and most importantly the food, not having pasta is probably the only thing I miss now that I follow a paleo based diet. ALAS, on a warm, Sunday evening I have managed to re-create one of my favourite dishes to be completely grain free. This version genuinely tastes better than the original, so much so that I’m already planning to make it again tomorrow. (YAY). So without further ado here is the recipe:

Ingredients:
• Zucchini Noodles (sometimes called courgette spirals)
• Coconut Oil
• Low-Fat Minced Meat
• Tomato Puree
• Spinach
• Mushrooms
• Tomatoes
• Red Pepper
• Asparagus
• Chia Seeds
• Flax Seeds

Method:

  • Wash, chop and peel the mushrooms, tomatoes and pepper.
  • Put a spoon of coconut oil into a frying pan and add approx. one serving of mince (125g) Fry on a medium heat for 5 minutes.
  • Put a spoon of coconut oil into a second frying pan and add the mushrooms, tomatoes, red pepper, asparagus and a large handful of spinach. Fry on a medium-high heat for 5 minutes.
  • Now add the tomato puree to the mince and continue to fry for 5 more minutes.
  • Add the zucchini noodles to the veg and continue to fry for 5 more minutes.
  • Plate up the zucchini noodles, add a bed of spinach, mushrooms and red peppers, followed by the mince then add the asparagus, chia seeds & flax seeds to complete the dish.

My Fitness Story: Part Two

Much like my previous post, My Fitness Story: Part One, upon where I documented how my diet had changed dramatically overtime, my workout regime has also had many ups and downs. During my scary transition from attempting to do something other than aimlessly run on the treadmill, I found myself making a lot of mistakes, having several staring competitions with the ‘how to use’ machine instructions and lots of moments of sheer panic when I realised, 15 squats in, that it was highly likely I would not have the energy to lift the weighted bar back off my shoulders (massive thank you to the many strangers who came to my assistance). It may sound silly, but no matter how embarrassing some of those situations were, I genuinely wouldn’t change a thing. Seeing as I was forced into learning from my many mistakes, this subsequently led to a feeling of gratitude over even the smallest of my personal achievements which, in the long run, helped me keep a clear perspective and improved my confidence.

When I first began training I was often conflicted over which goals I wanted to pursue for my body. Did I want to try and look like a stereotypical sun, sea and sand Instagram model? Or did I want to be able to lift heavier weights than the men at my gym? Firstly, I decided to try the cardio and high intensity approach to my fitness. This definitely brought visible progress and I was happy to be feeling more lean, but one worried question from a high school teacher later (she was concerned I was anorexic) made me cut back from my 5 sessions a week of cardio. Looking back, I now know that doing that amount of cardio, on top of my already naturally high metabolism, was not in fact my finest decision. However, in my head I was going to the gym multiple times a week, therefore I was simply being super healthy.

After pondering over whether I did in fact look too skinny, I decided I liked the appearance of my stomach and my waist but I wanted to gain muscle pretty much EVERYWHERE else. This is the point of my fitness journey where I saw a lot of progress in my body, consumed the most calories and repeatedly overused the hashtag ‘#weights’. I started using heavy weights for my glute, leg, arms and ab workouts, which definitely improved my overall physique. I began to look somewhat curvier in certain areas, particularly my glutes and legs, which only encouraged me to carry on upping both my weights and reps. This was a very bad decision on my part and has now left me with some niggling joint issues. Due to my body responding well to weights at the time, I had no desire or need to research efficient stretching, complimentary cardio to weight exercises or even simply different workouts, therefore I started to suffer from constant achy joints, a feeling of stress and zero motivation towards my workouts.

Coincidently, I developed a stomach infection at the end of last summer which forced me to re-evaluate my whole fitness and diet regime. Due to feeling both physically and mentally weak, I had a sudden drive to want to be strong. Not necessarily strong in the sense that I had bulging muscles and could’ve been mistaken for an aspiring bodybuilder, but in the sense that my body responded well to what I was doing. This brings me to my current fitness routine of weight training twice a week, a pilates or yoga based class twice a week and a cardio session once a week. This balance has given me the best results I’ve ever had; I’m building muscle from weight training, I’m then toning and strengthening these muscles during pilates or yoga and then I’m burning any excess fat during cardio.

I have learnt a hell of a lot about fitness since I started regularly going to the gym and I’m incredibly grateful to have finally realised that being fit is not about whether you look like a fitness model on Instagram or another member of your gym, it’s about feeling good in your own skin and enjoying your preferred method of fitness, whatever that is.

Meal Prep: Your New Best Friend?

Despite being painfully overused on social media, the phrase “abs are made in the kitchen” is in fact very true. You can train seven days a week but if you’re not feeding your body with the correct nutrients then you will see limited progress. More often than not, eating the wrong type of food isn’t down to purposely neglecting your body, it’s simply an issue of lack of time and preparation.

Spending half an hour at night prepping your meals for the following day, or getting up a bit earlier in the morning, is a highly effective way to stop you from quickly grabbing the same supermarket meal deal which you have eaten every day for the past year and a half. I found it fairly difficult to know where to begin with meal prepping when I first started, but I now swear by these five steps.

 

Make A Meal Plan

There’s nothing quite like planning your meals for the week ahead to cure Sunday night boredom. For each day write down what you’re going to have for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner as well as leaving room for two interchangeable snacks. I personally base what I choose for my daily snacks on whether they’re going to be pre or post workout, and what area of the body I’m training on that specific day. On glute, leg and shoulder days I like to incorporate a lot of protein so I’ll have protein balls or a protein bar. Whereas for a day when I’m training abs I’ll have something lighter like sliced banana on oat crackers.

 

Double Up

The great thing about planning your meals, alongside the heavily reduced stress levels, is being able to double up. If you’re making tuna and sweetcorn pasta salad for your dinner, then double up on the ingredients and set some aside to take to work, university or school the next day. This saves both time and money and ensures you won’t be tempted to the vending machine.

 

Keep A Food Diary

For those who are just starting out with meal prepping and changing your diet, a great way to see which foods make you feel like Beyoncé and which foods make you want to crawl into a hole is to keep a food diary. You’ll be able to tell exactly which foods don’t agree with you within a couple of weeks if you keep your meals fairly consistent. For me, I found that I felt lethargic whenever I had consumed a fruit salad, due to the sudden high intake of fructose, therefore I now only include a handful of fruit on some of my breakfasts, which prevents this feeling.

 

Have One Cheat Meal A Week

Unless you want to go certifiably insane and start hallucinating pizza, then it’s important to have one cheat meal per week. This will be enough to satisfy your cravings, provide more motivation to smash your workouts and give you something to look forward to every week. I usually time my cheat meal with my rest day, so I’m 110% focused to get back to clean eating and the gym the following day.

 

Don’t Overthink

Meal prep certainly aids your fitness routine as a structured guide, but it’s important not to overthink and become obsessive. If you’ve had a really bad day and you’re sadly staring at your designated snack wishing it was a packet of crisps, then swap it. As long as for the majority of the time you’re sticking to good, whole foods then one change isn’t going to make ANY difference. One workout won’t transform your body therefore one packet of crisps won’t revoke your progress.